Abstract Dunes
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Abstract Dunes Abstract Dunes

Abstract Dunes

Mathilde Guillemot

$ 39.00
Print Dimension:
20"x28" (Rectangular)
20"x20" (Square)



The Story

“Abstract dunes” is a black and white photography portraying a desert landscape. As for the romantic era (19th century), landscapes often represented the complex inner landscape of human beings, and deserts were of course a type of landscape often used as metaphor due to its extreme climate. The black and white brings the viewer back to the birth of photography, and perhaps creates a sense of nostalgia which resonates along with the history of photography.

Details of Abstract Dunes

On Abstract Dunes

“Abstract dunes” is a black and white photography portraying a desert landscape. As for the romantic era (19th century), landscapes often represented the complex inner landscape of human beings, and deserts were of course a type of landscape often used as metaphor due to its extreme climate. The black and white brings the viewer back to the birth of photography, and perhaps creates a sense of nostalgia which resonates along with the history of photography.

The title itself might suggest a space for this kind of interpretation, whereas only “Dunes” would have narrowed it down as it is a more descriptive title. Adding the word “Abstract”, however, marks the image with a broader horizon, where the viewer can choose whether or not to further contemplate the motif.

About Mathilde Guillemot

Mathilde is a member of the highly curated 1X fine arts photography community. With a keen eye for beautiful compositions, Mathilde is a graphic designer and has been an artistic director in France for more than 10 years. Best known for her nature and action shots, she views photography as a solitary adventure. Her sources of inspiration include the work of Nick Brandt, Marsel Van Oosten, Wolf Ademeit, and of her own father whom she lovingly compares to Indiana Jones.

To Mathilde, the story behind an image, the emotion, the beauty or the harshness, are more important than technical perfection.